Lunch Lessons: Three Tips from a Magazine Editor

September 18, 2015, In: Business Tips, DO
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She emails me, “I’m here! Are you almost here, too?”

I look at my watch: I’m 10 minutes late after dealing with a small “fire” in my business. Luckily the cafe is right next to my apartment so I rush downstairs and skid into my seat apologetically just minutes later. As soon as I get there, interesting conversation begins; we talk about the Paleo diet, sugar in juices, NYC events, and travel.

Then, for a moment, I am unsure of why I’m there… and I’m thinking she’s probably feeling the same. But we both know we are supposed to be meeting. She was a judge at Savor’s first “Editor Shark Tank” in Manhattan, and we had been meaning to get together for over five months. Something had to be important about this.

She asks me for advice on business, and in return I ask her to share the best and worst pitches she’s ever received (because I love hearing stuff like that.)

“The best one I received recently was from a professional bridesmaid. She wrote me an email with a catchy subject line and told me that she started a side business being a professional bridesmaid. She asked if I wanted to write about her, and I said ‘done!’ See, all you need is catchy packaging and you’ll get tons of editors who want to write about it from different angles.”

I lean in. “But you know that saying ‘all you need is catchy packaging’ is like saying, ‘just be an awesome person.’ That’s so vague and frustrating for a lot of entrepreneurs to hear.”

“You’re right,” she responded. Then silence.

I know that she has written for New York Post, SELF, Redbook and more, so with her wealth of experience, I wanted to discover the secret formula to create eye-catching pitches… the kind that spark interest for major magazine writers like herself.

So I added, “Okay, give me some tips on how to be ‘catchy’ to pass along to Savor members so we can be helpful!”

Here are three things she shared with me:

Credibility. “Stop pitching me if you don’t have the credibility to back it up. Credibility doesn’t equal launching a business. Do you have a degree in psychology? Have you written a book? Are you a yoga teacher at a major studio?”

Everyone is a coach. “Don’t call yourself a coach because it will get the eye roll. Do you teach a class or a workshop? Focus on that versus calling yourself a coach.”

Be cool. “Stay in front of me without harassing me. There’s a fine line. What most don’t understand is that it can take a year and a half for a pitch or story to marinate. Patience is key.”

Side Note from me: I concur… my PR team and I have been sharing stories with the New York Times “for ages” (as my daughter Sienna would say) and finally were featured for our Woodstock spa opening. Patience and persistence, not my cup of tea but so important! 

And lastly…

Have catchy packaging.

I look up from taking notes. There’s that again. She notices my annoyance and smiles.

“That’s for another lunch,” we agree. We ask a stylish older woman to take our photo, and she tries to no avail. So we ask the waiter to take a photo of us three all together.

annie daly_ajk

 

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Angela Jia Kim

Angela Jia Kim

Eco-beauty entrepreneur and intuitive business mentor, Angela Jia Kim, believes that the best beauty tip is to live your dream. She pulls from her experiences as a serial entrepreneur, jet-setting concert pianist, New York City (not house) wife, and mom to help others from beauty to business at savorbeauty.com and savorthesuccess.com.

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